Lerderderg Track – General Condition Report – (Updated 18 March 2017)

Lerderderg Track

DELWP has advised that the Lerderderg Track in their territory (most of the track between Daylesford and Blackwood Mineral Springs) is again open to the public.

DEWLP has carried out a full risk assessment of their section of the Lerderderg Track, and considers it is now in satisfactory condition.

It’s worth noting the the track is classified as  basic.’  Below are the guidelines for what DELWP consider to be reasonably expected for a basic track:

Visitors

  • Opportunity for visitors to explore and discover relatively undisturbed natural environments along defined and distinct tracks with minimal (if any) facilities. Posted throughout.
  • Users need a moderate level of specialised skills such as navigational skills. Users may require maps and navigation equipment to successfully complete the track. Users need to be self-reliant, particularly in regard to emergency first aid and possible weather hazards.
  • Users can expect opportunities for solitude with few encounters with others.

Access

  • Tracks generally distinct without major modification to the ground. Encounters with fallen debris and other obstacles are likely.
  • Track gradient limited to environmental and maintenance considerations.
  • Disabled access not provided.
  • Storms and severe weather may affect navigation and safety.

Information, Interpretation & Education

  • Minimal signage for management and directional purposes.
  • Track and features shown on GDTA Lerderderg Track  maps  brochure (A3 size) in satellite format.
  • Track  shown on map produced by Meridian (A1 size) in cartographic format.

Visitor Facilities

  • Facilities generally not provided except for specific safety and environmental considerations.
  • Track head facilities may include toilets, picnic facilities, car parking, drinking water, campsites and information shelters.

Management Services

  • Management intervention is low to moderate.
  • Tracks will be inspected on a regular basis and after major natural events such as cyclones or fires. Inspection interval: 6 to 12 months.

 

Page last updated 18 March 2017